Saturday, April 4, 2020

New England gun background checks hit record high in March 

Posted by Wayne G. Barber

The FBI shows that the federal government has conducted more background checks in Vermont last month than in any month previously recorded: 7,023.
The last time background checks approached this level was in March 2018, as the Vermont Legislature debated a series of gun control measures that Gov. Phil Scott ultimately signed into law.

That month, the FBI conducted just under 6,200 checks for Vermont gun purchases.

Between August and February, the number of background checks hovered around 3,000 per month.

“People are, for lack of a better word, scared,”  said Trish Jones, who owns Green Mountain Sporting Goods, a gun store in Irasburg.

Last month, her business saw so much demand that it had to start limiting the amount of ammunition it could sell to individual customers. And she said the pandemic has brought many first-time gun owners to her store.
“We’ve seen a lot of people realize that the Second Amendment isn’t just for the hunting rights,” Jones said. “They’re concerned about protecting their families
On Friday, the Scott administration clarified that gun stores can stay open in Vermont during the COVID-19 crisis as long as they “limit in-person transactions.” 

The Agency of Commerce and Community Development recommends they conduct sales curbside or by appointment only, according to the office’s latest guidance

The Trump administration said earlier this week that gun shops should be considered “essential” businesses during the COVID-19 crisis. Until Friday, the state has not specifically weighed in on the status of gun stores after it ordered businesses deemed non-essential to shut down in-person operations.

Jones had already started offering curbside sales before the government issued its guidance this week. She said she is still seeing an uptick in business.
On Friday, the Scott administration clarified that gun stores can stay open in Vermont during the COVID-19 crisis as long as they “limit in-person transactions.” 

The Agency of Commerce and Community Development recommends they conduct sales curbside or by appointment only, according to the office’s latest guidance

The Trump administration said earlier this week that gun shops should be considered “essential” businesses during the COVID-19 crisis. Until Friday, the state has not specifically weighed in on the status of gun stores after it ordered businesses deemed non-essential to shut down in-person operations.

Jones had already started offering curbside sales before the government issued its guidance this week. She said she is still seeing an uptick in business. 
The FBI’s latest numbers show there has been a surge in gun sales across the country. 
The federal government conducted 3.7 million background checks in March, a 33% increase over February. That’s the most it has logged in a single month since it put its background check database online in 1998, according to Newsweek.
Bill Moore, a lobbyist for the Vermont Traditions Coalition, a gun-rights group, said the same impulse people had to stock up on toilet paper, food and other basic items during the pandemic is what drove them to purchase firearms last month.
“I’m assuming it’s people wanting to feel safe in their homes and secure in defending their families,” Moore said.
“I consider having Band-Aids and aspirin in the cupboard a way to protect your family. I don’t differentiate.”
The increase in sales has caused some gun control activists to call for firearms restrictions. On Friday, the gun control group Moms Demand Action called on Scott to take steps to close what is known as “Charleston Loophole.”
That loophole allows those seeking to buy firearms to receive some weapons before the FBI is able to complete a background check. 
The loophole was what let the shooter in the deadly church shooting in 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina, obtain a weapon.
Under current law, if a check isn’t completed in three days, a firearm can still be sold.
Last week, Rhode Island’s governor signed an executive order giving law enforcement 30 days to complete the background check before a purchase can be made. 
“Our law enforcement agencies, hospitals, and first responders are stretched thin as it is, and they shouldn’t have to worry about more guns in the hands of people who shouldn’t have them,” Seton McIlroy, a volunteer with the group, said in a statement.

Source: Vt. Digger




Thursday, April 2, 2020

MAINE REMINDER: ATV trails are CLOSED for mud season!

Posted by Wayne G. Barber  Photos property of Wayne G.Barber


MAINE REMINDER: ATV trails are now CLOSED for mud season!

Please Check on New Hampshire and Vermont Regulations also:


Riding on trails before they open can cause significant damage and cause landowners to close trails to all in the future. Don't do it!



When will the trails open? Conditions around the state are varied and the decision to open trails is managed by the property owner and/or the club or organization who maintains the trail system. Nobody should expect any of the trails to open before May. All signs should have an opening date of May 15 or later. 



Do your part and respect private landowners and ATV clubs by obeying all mud season closure postings.



Thank You!.

Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Outdoor Scene Nation , Salutes L.L.Bean

Posted by Wayne G. Barber

THANK YOU !

BRUNSWICK — L.L.Bean employees who typically sew the iconic Bean Boots and totes started sewing Bean’s dog bed liners into medical masks on Monday, with plans for as many as 10,000 a day, most bound for MaineHealth, according to a company spokeswoman.

“Based on the properties of the material — soft, liquid resistant, durable and washable — we are working with MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and other labs to see if they can be used as surgical masks,” said Amanda Hannah, L.L.Bean’s director of external communications.

Surgical masks have been heavily in demand and difficult to find during the spread of COVID-19.

L.L.Bean CEO Stephen Smith on Monday described the dog bed liner masks on CNBC‘s “Power Lunch” as breathable and “very durable.”

“A number of our employees said, ‘Hey, we are the best stitchers, cutters and sewers,'” said Smith. “‘We make the best boots in the world … We can make masks, gowns and booties as well,’ and they immediately started experimenting.”

Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Connecticut Opens Up 2020 Trout Season Early Today

Posted by Wayne G. Barber

We are very pleased to announce that Governor Ned Lamont has opened fishing in the Inland District, including trout fishing effective today (3/24/20). All other regulations for fishing, including, but not limited to, licensing, stamps, methods, catch-and-release areas, creel limits and length limits shall remain in effect. Anglers shall practice social distancing measures, such as remaining six feet apart. 


Early Opening of Fishing Season. Notwithstanding Section 26-112 of the Connecticut General Statutes and any associated regulations, effective immediately and through the remainder of the 2020 fishing season, unless earlier modified or terminated by the Commissioner of Energy and Environmental Protection, there is no closed season for fishing in the inland waters of Connecticut. The Commissioner of Energy and Environmental Protection may extend or modify the open seasons for inland waters fishing without notice and public hearing and issue any implementing orders she deems necessary consistent with this order. All other regulations for fishing, including, but not limited to, licensing, stamps, methods, catch-and-release areas, creel limits and length limits shall remain in effect. Anglers shall practice social distancing measures, such as remaining six feet apart.
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Friday, March 20, 2020

Pennsylvania Game Commission Releases Deer Harvest Report

Posted by Wayne G. Barber

Buck harvest up 10 percent, overall harvest highest in 15 years.

Pennsylvania hunters posted their highest overall deer harvest in 15 years when they took 389,431 deer during the state’s 2019-20 hunting seasons, which closed in January, the Pennsylvania Game Commission reported today.

The 2019-20 deer harvest topped the previous year’s harvest of 374,690 by about 4 percent. The last time the total deer harvest exceeded this season’s total was in 2004-05, when 409,320 whitetails were taken.

The statewide buck harvest saw a generous bump of 10 percent, coming in at 163,240. In the 2018-19 seasons, 147,750 bucks were taken. In the preceding license year, 163,750 bucks were harvested. The largest harvest in the antler-restrictions era – 165,416 – occurred in the first year.

“One of the highlights of the 2019-20 deer harvest was deer hunters continue to experience antlered harvest success levels comparable to historic highs in the late 1990s and early 2000s,” noted Christopher Rosenberry, Game Commission Deer and Elk Section supervisor. “In recent years, about 17 to 18 percent of all hunters harvested an antlered deer, and we look for this trend to continue.

The antlerless deer harvest over the 2019-20 seasons was 226,191, which includes 10,461 taken with chronic wasting disease Deer Management Assistance Program permits. The 2018-19 overall antlerless deer harvest was 226,940, which was about 10 percent larger than the 2017-18 harvest of 203,409.

Except on Deer Management Assistance Program properties and in Wildlife Management Areas 2B, 5B and 5D, antlerless deer hunting with firearms doesn’t begin until the first Saturday of deer rifle season. That has limited antlerless deer hunting to seven of the rifle season’s 13 days.

Still, hunters took a good number of antlerless deer, mirroring the 2018-19 antlerless deer harvest.

“Keeping harvest pressure on antlerless deer is critical in our ongoing efforts to address the risk of chronic wasting disease (CWD), particularly in Disease Management Areas,” explained Rosenberry. “That hunters took over 10,000 antlerless deer with DMA DMAP permits illustrates the cooperation we need from deer hunters to help whitetails where CWD threats are at their greatest in Penn’s Woods.”

Across the 23 Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) used by the Game Commission to manage whitetails, the antlerless deer harvest decreased in almost half of them. The largest harvest declines occurred in WMU 2H, 39 percent, WMU 3A, 23 percent and WMU 1B, 20 percent.
WMUs posting the largest antlerless deer harvest increases were WMU 3B, 23 percent; WMU 4D, 21 percent; and WMU 4B, 20 percent.

On the antlered deer side of WMU-level harvests, the buck harvest dropped in only three units: WMUs 2C, 2H and 5D. The largest increases in antlered deer harvest were in WMU 2G, 29 percent; WMU 3C, 22 percent; WMU 4C, 21 percent; and WMU 3A, 19 percent.

The percentage of older bucks in the 2019-20 deer harvest remained amazingly high. About 66 percent of the bucks taken by hunters were at least 2½ years old. The remainder were 1½ years old.

“Pennsylvania deer hunters consistently continue to take 2½-year and older bucks over younger antlered bucks – by a two-to-one margin – in the Commonwealth,” said Game Commission Executive Director Bryan Burhans. “If you hunted deer before antler restrictions, you know how significant this is. Most of us have waited a lifetime for deer hunting like Pennsylvania has today!

“The whitetail bucks roaming Penn’s Woods today are a product of an intensely managed deer herd,” Burhans noted. “But their existence also hinged on the willingness of deer hunters to sacrifice shooting spikes and small fork-horns for bucks with substantially more headgear!”

About 69 percent of the antlerless deer harvest was adult females; button-bucks comprised 16 percent and doe fawns made up 15 percent. In the 2018-19 seasons, adult females comprised 66 percent of the antlerless deer harvest.

Bowhunters accounted for about a third of Pennsylvania’s 2019-20 overall deer harvest, taking 145,908 deer (74,190 bucks and 71,718 antlerless deer) with either bows or crossbows. The 2018-19 archery buck harvest was 54,350, while the archery antlerless deer harvest was 56,369; unseasonably warm weather and rain impacted many fall bowhunting days in 2018.

“That bowhunters added 35,000 more deer to the overall archery deer harvest suggests bowhunters continue to improve their harvest success,” Rosenberry said. “Overall, though, bowhunters still are responsible for about a third of the statewide overall deer harvest, which is similar to the 2018-19 seasons.”

The muzzleloader harvest – 29,604 – was up from to the previous year’s harvest of 23,909. The 2019-20 muzzleloader harvest included 1,260 antlered bucks compared to 1,290 bucks in the 2018-19 seasons.




Sunday, March 15, 2020

North America's most abundant bird......

Posted by Wayne G. Barber    &    Photos by Wayne G. Barber(R)

MOURNING DOVE

Adapted to a variety of open habitats, these doves also raise a lot of youngsters—as many as six broods a year in warmer climates. So even though they ordinarily lay only two eggs per clutch, a pair can produce up to a dozen offspring every year. Estimates of their population range as low as 100 million and as high as 475 million. They started mating two weeks ago and every day 4 to6 and when a storm is coming it's swells to 16 at the ground feed that I put out. Very passive with all the others and some come up to my window if I over sleep. After they feed I observe them hunkering down close by in the dry oak leaves facing the morning sun to keep a little warmer.



Hello, my name is Oscar.


Hello, my name is Ester.